Age Dynamics Late Teens and Twenties

Age Dynamics Late Teens and Twenties

Skin is at its healthiest for most in their 20s. It still has that luminous glow, and is supple and firm. The focus for optimal skin health is on damage prevention and maintaining skin health. A home care system should cleanse with a milk- or gel-based cleanser; correct using a gentle retinol formula, nourish using vitamin A, peptides and antioxidants; moisturize using hyaluronic acid and aloe; and protect using broad band sunscreen minimum level 30.

Age Dynamics Thirties

Age Dynamics Thirties

For homecare a gentle milk- and protein-based cleanser is recommended. A gentle scrub using beads will help keep skin exfoliated. For nourishment, an antioxidant or vitamin complex is perfect. The finishing touch is a moisturizer containing amino acids and peptides, and an SPF 30. For discoloration, a lightener is recommended. The eyes can be quite revealing when it comes to aging. A hydrating or Vitamin C eye treatment is recommended.

Age Dynamics Fourties

Age Dynamics Fourties

Home care begins with a good cleanser AHA gel for acne, which may be due to hormonal changes. Integrating growth factors, retinol, plenty of antioxidants, such vitamin C, and specialized eye care with peptides and hydrating factors. A daily SPF of 30 is perfect for protection

Age Dynamics Fifties and Sixties

Age Dynamics Fifties and Sixties

Home care. To specifically address aging, focus on cleansing, breaking down, rebuilding and protecting the skin. A gentle milk-based cleanser will work well, especially for post-corrective treatments. Be sure to integrate peptides, growth factors, antioxidants, hyaluronic acid and a protein-packed eye serum.

"Two primary culprits cause skin aging: intrinsic and extrinsic ages. Intrinsic, or internal, refers to the biological aging that occurs with the passing of time. It is the less controllable of the two factors, as it is namely genetic programming and physiological decline. Extrinsic, or external, are more controllable factors, such as sun exposure, smoking, sleep, diet and stress—lifestyle factors and personal choices.

Although the skin can repair itself, this ability to recover slows as a person ages. This is compounded by oxidation stresses, such as free radicals, which penetrate skin cells, breaking down collagen and impacting its DNA structure. Over time, the cell is more likely to replicate the damaged cell and they multiply.  Collagen, which is responsible for limiting the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles, and saggy, slack and crepe-like skin, also decreases production with age. Signs of aging occur when the fibroblast cells that restore damaged collagen fibers can no longer complete the repair.

Two of the most valuable age-reversal components to help clients prevent further damage and deterioration are retinol and an SPF 30 physical sunscreen. Treatment programs and home-care regimens that include retinol focus on breaking down the skin, and rebuilding, repairing and protecting it.  In addition, antioxidants, such as L-ascorbic acid, also help reverse the effects of aging. Topicals rich in antioxidants will help firm, tone, tighten and refine lines, and give skin an overall glow. Clients also should look for ingredients, such as ascorbic acid, tocopherols, retinoids and L-lactic acid, to name a few. The trick with topical antioxidants, however, is that they must have an adequate delivery system and be absorbed into the epidermis to impact the cell.

Of course, sun protection is important for preventing further deterioration. An SPF 30 worn daily will help prevent much of the aging effect. Remember, most of the skin’s aging—dehydration, cell decline and damage, and discoloration—is a result of sun overexposure. Be sure to educate clients at every age about the significance of proper protection and always integrate a broad-spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 30 into their treatment plans."   SKIN INC, Nov, 2012.

Skin Dynamics by Age